Boiler Feedwater

Boilers & Corrosion Control in the Power Industry

By Brad Buecker and Julia Horn

AMMONIA BOILERS CHLORIDES COPPER CORROSION DEAERATION IRON MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION PHOSPHATE PITTING POWER STAINLESS STEEL STEEL TURBINES

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Abstract

In 2001, NACE reported that corrosion of industry, transportation, and other infrastructure in the U.S. cost $276 billion annually, or just over 3% of the GDP. Despite the seemingly endless reports that continue to emerge about the countryï¾’s decaying infrastructure, one has to assume that this cost is even greater in the second decade of the new millennium. Several billion annually is attributed to the power industry alone, much of it due to corrosion by water and steam. Many lessons that were learned by experienced personnel in the coal-fired power industry have not been suitably transferred to combined-cycle power plant personnel, or the knowledge has disappeared due to the retirement of many Baby Boomers. This article examines a number of the most important corrosion issues within the power industry (many of which also apply to other industries), and outlines tools and resources to mitigate these issues. Issues examined include boilers, ammonia, chlorides, copper, corrosion, deaeration, iron, materials of construction, phosphate, power, stainless steel, and turbines.

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Revised toray june 18.upm digital

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