Cooling Water

Can Bleach Degradation in Sodium Hypochlorite Storage Tanks Be Controlled?

By Mike Wilson

BIOCIDE BLEACH CHEMICAL STORAGE CHLORINE CHLORINATION COOLING WATER COPPER DECOMPOSITION DISINFECTION NICKEL pH PROCUREMENT SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE

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Abstract

Is it possible to control the rate of sodium hypochlorite degradation in storage tanks? This is an important question for operators of cooling towers and other industrial process water users that depend on sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for microbial control. This rate may be impacted by a number of factors and this article explores ways users may take to minimize NaOCl decay in order to achieve effective water treatment.

Background

NaOCl solution is a common biocide used to treat water in cooling towers and other industrial processes as well as drinking water and swimming pools. Sodium hypochlorite solutions ranging from 3% to 8.25% NaOCl by weight are sold as common household bleach. Recently, Clorox increased its standard bleach from 5.5% to 8.25% NaOCl by weight. Stronger solutions are sold for industrial use. As sodium hypochlorite decomposes, its dosage rate must be increased to maintain the same level of chlorination. Therefore, hypochlorite procurement cost can be minimized by preventing its decomposition, which is affected by seven factors:

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Revised toray june 18.upm digital

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